40 Things to Know About the Heritage College

A lot can happen in 40 years. Since our founding, our alumni, our faculty and staff, and our students have accomplished so much.

Each achievement is striking in its own right. Together, though, they tell an impressive story about the integral role our college has played – and will continue to play – in improving the health of people throughout our state, our nation and around the world.

In this “40 Things to Know” series, we’ve chosen 40 facts, initiatives, ideas and people that make our college extraordinary. Whether you’re a longtime Heritage College family member or you’re learning about us for the first time, please follow along as we lift up a few of the things that shape who we are today.

We hope you’ll be as proud as we are. Our previous successes provide the foundation that is sure to make the next 40 years even better.

Meeting Ohio’s Healthcare Needs Against the Odds

_DSC0037.jpgADDRESSING OHIO’S GREAT HEALTH CARE CHALLENGES WITH A NEW OSTEOPATHIC MEDICAL SCHOOL TOOK VISION, PERSISTENCE AND A HEALTHY DOES OF COURAGE.

The legislation establishing our college was signed by Ohio Gov. James Rhodes on Aug. 18, 1975. The act stipulated that the first class be admitted within one year, a seemingly impossible deadline for developing a medical school. But we did it. When you look into the facts around the founding of the college, that the college came into existence at all seems miraculous. Against the odds, the college opened in 1976, thanks to a clear vision, persistence and a healthy dose of courage.  

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Our People: Harry Meshel, Senator and Lobbyist for the Heritage College

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“The rest of the state still needs you”

It could be fairly said that the Ohio University Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine would not exist without Harry Meshel, an Ohio state senator from 1971-93. The Youngstown Democrat forged a coalition of lawmakers, physicians and academics to lobby for and pass the legislation that chartered and funded the college in 1975.

Osteopathic connection: “I had always had an affection for the osteopathic process. My late wife had a D.O. who was a good friend of hers. Both of our kids were born to her.”

A college’s difficult birth: “Everybody was against us except [the Ohio Osteopathic Association]. My tradition in life is, when people start objecting, you fight harder. You teach them to respect you and understand you. That’s what you have to do with legislation. We began working, we drew allies in, got the speaker of the house interested, and got people in the senate interested.”

Motivation: In addition to his belief in osteopathic medicine, Meshel saw the college’s potential to transform health care in southeast Ohio. “I was on a social mission. There was virtually nothing else down in that corner of the state.”

A sweet victory: “Politics is usually a long line of headaches – people making you crazy, you never get to close any doors. It’s like a doctor: Sometimes you can’t solve the problem. But when you’re able to close a few doors, when you get to solve the problem, that’s satisfaction. [Helping establish the college] has been a wonderful experience for me.”

Point of pride: “That the doctors coming out of Ohio University stay here. They stay in the state. The school has just gone great guns. It’s one of the most pleasant surprises, how fast OU grew and how well they did. I was very happy and proud to be a part of it.”

Parting thought: “Don’t stop! You’ve just begun to build. You’re so successful. It’s like sports: Just because you’ve won a few games doesn’t mean you get to quit. The rest of the state still needs you. Kick the pants off the competition!”

 


Founding Voices
Perspectives from those whose personal story is woven into the college’s beginning. 

Our People: Anthony Chila, D.O.

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“The hands-on part is central to the whole idea”

Chila has had contact with every Heritage College graduating class, and his passion for teaching osteopathic manipulative medicine (OMM) has left many Heritage College alumni with a favorite Chila story. He joined the Heritage College faculty in 1978, and today is a professor emeritus of family medicine and faculty practitioner at University Medical Associates. A leading authority on OMM, he has served a variety of leadership roles in the American Academy of Osteopathy and in 2013 received the American Osteopathic Foundation’s Educator of the Year award.

Favorite class?: “I always had a great deal of favoritism for the Class of 1982. I enjoyed that group of people tremendously. I think they had as much fun with me, poking fun at me, as I had with them, harassing them. It was just a kind of a chemistry with that particular group. And that, by the way, was part of my learning process.”

Osteopathic medicine’s “secret sauce”: “The hands-on part is central to the whole idea of what an osteopathic physician is or is to be. Unfortunately, there is so much material thrown at students that it just boggles my mind that they can struggle with the hard-core academic material and still have some interest and some hope that they want to get something from the hands-on.”

His inspiration: “That ‘aha’ moment when you are working with your hands and you are trying to explain to a student or intern or a resident what it is you are looking for, how it is that you are preparing to make a diagnosis and what it is that you’re doing when you are implementing a treatment. There is something about that close work one-on-one with the student or resident over a patient and there seems to come a time when a huge light bulb goes on and a student literally says ‘aha, I understand what you’re talking about.’”

Parting thought: “Happy 40th anniversary, Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine. It’s been a pleasure and a privilege to be with you.”

 


Founding Voices
Perspectives from those whose personal story is woven into the college’s beginning.