Alumnus Dr. Moomaw addresses graduates, talks psychiatry, flight surgery

Forty years after starting medical school with our first entering class, alumnus Ronald C. Moomaw, D.O. (’80), brought it all back home May 7 as commencement speaker for the Heritage College class of 2016. Moomaw, a psychiatrist and flight surgeon who works with NASA astronauts, reminisced about the high adventure of launching a new medical college in converted dormitory buildings and lauded the school for giving him “the chance to have the most fascinating life I could possibly imagine.” He was one of 24 medical students who began their studies here in 1976. With 129 new physicians, the class of 2016 is the largest graduating class in the college’s history.

Watch a video of Dr. Moomaw’s commencement address.

View a gallery of photos from Commencement 2016. See more photos on Facebook. 

Read more.

Our People: Mark Loudin, Technology Expert and Friend

Mark-Loudin

“I have never enjoyed anything more than becoming friends with our many students”

There are those who sit in the front of the class and those who prefer the back of the class. And then there are those who’d rather sit with Mark Loudin.

How many of our alumni, faculty and staff did a spell in the Irvine 194 lecture hall control booth with Mark? Mark joined the Heritage College in 1999 as multimedia producer and director, with a responsibility and an incomparable talent for ensuring that the classroom technology works effortlessly for faculty and students. A familiar face – and voice – to nearly half of our graduates, many of us have have appreciated his warm welcome and a moment of respite in that dark room, participating in the classroom intensity from behind the glass wall, and enjoying Mark’s company, counsel and hundreds of refrigerator magnets and collection of college memorabilia.

Favorite part of his job: “Seeing a first-year student attending orientation, timid and afraid, without confidence and a bit more than overwhelmed. In four short years, that same individual blossoms into a confident, competent leader and then graduates – and enters a practice as a trusted and life-altering physician.”

Thoughts on technology: “Computer-age students have demanded that we change the way we approach education. We record and post thousands of classes and events and make them available in minutes online. We have integrated several types of technology into a cohesive unit of learning, which is unique of any medical school on the planet. Our students are amazing, and giving them the proper tools to learn and truly integrate the medical knowledge they must possess helps them in the real world.”

Inspiration: “I have had a very fortunate career. I have interviewed two sitting presidents, worked NFL sidelines for thousands of games, won a bunch of TV awards. All of that pales in my mind to the pride and accomplishment I feel on a Heritage College graduation day. I have never enjoyed anything more than becoming friends with our many students, and I certainly enjoy keeping in touch with as many as I can.”

Parting thought: “Let’s go! On to the next ideas, advancements and accomplishments!”

Our People: Sherman Brooks, ‘Resident Dean of Humanity’

yearbook024Reminisce with any member of our first class and sooner or later you’re likely to hear about Sherman Brooks, who served as mentor, confidante, adviser and tutor to students from 1976, when the college opened, till his retirement in 1985. And he did it all while keeping the hallways clean.

“There was a janitor – he was the nicest guy,” remembers 1980 alum Stephanie Knapp, D.O., now a pediatrician and allergist in Pennsylvania. “He was from southern Ohio. He was very encouraging when we were studying at night. He was such a great guy, and I really remember him and how kind he was and how welcoming.”

Knapp is just one of the many alums who still remember Brooks, who died in 1987. A 1978 student yearbook featured an in-depth feature on him, reporting that the custodian “has gained a legacy of respect from the osteopathic students by not only being a physical plant employee, but also a ‘resident dean of humanity’ … What can you say about a janitor who can tell you how cadavers are preserved, explain the functions of the heart, know the birthdates of 59 students and root and cheer for them through every arduous step of their scholastic career?”

Brooks reportedly had a lifelong interest in medicine, and had asked Ohio University to transfer him to work in Grosvenor Hall when the new medical school opened. “He would quiz the kids, and they loved him,” recalls Chip Rogers, who first worked for the college as assistant and driver to first Dean Gerald Faverman, and later went on to become director of alumni relations and director of advocacy.

In 1990, a number of people who had been with the college from its earliest days got together to honor the man who had always remembered students’ birthdays and had a kindly word to offer when they needed one. Some 25 year later, the Sherman Brooks Memorial Scholarship is still helping first-year students from small southeastern Ohio towns who have expressed an interest in rural family practice.

Do you have a Sherman story? If so, please share below.