Our People: Tom Fries, Sponsor of Founding Legislation

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Tom Fries was on hand at the Ohio Statehouse in April 2016 when the Heritage College celebrated 40 years of service to the state.

How lucky I was to be asked to have a part”

Tom Fries, a Democrat from Dayton, was serving his third term in the Ohio House of Representatives when he became lead sponsor of the 1975 legislation that created what is now the Ohio University Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine. The former Major League Baseball player served six terms in the Ohio House and was appointed to fill a vacant Ohio Senate seat in 1982. Rather than seek election to a full term in the senate, Fries retired from the legislature and founded his own consulting firm.

Favorite memory: “Walking into the renovated Grosvenor Hall with George Dunigan [now the college’s director of governmental relations].” Fries had seen the building previously: “It was still a dormitory ready to become a medical college.” After the renovation, “the cafeteria had been transformed into an anatomy lab complete with 16 cadavers in the walk-in cooler! We commoners don’t see that every day.”

On changing attitudes: “In the beginning, barriers existed among the established disciplines of medicine. I believe [the Heritage College] was the driving force in Ohio to help completely destroy the roadblocks and biases that existed. Today, osteopathic medicine is totally integrated in all disciplines of health care and has been the leader in a more holistic … approach in treatment to the patient.”

Making the grade: “I go back to the original criteria for entering students, which was, ‘Would this young man or woman be the kind of practitioner [the college] wanted to produce?’ By that I think they always wanted to graduate a doctor with personality, compassion, common sense … and of course the ability to succeed academically. But grades were not always the determining factor. And that’s the way it should always be.”

Point of pride: “Having a small part in creating such a vibrant, progressive institution that’s made a difference in millions of lives for 40 years now. Every once in a while I stop and think how lucky I was to be asked to have a part in the creation of [the Heritage College]. Not to mention the wonderful people I’ve met along the way.”

Parting thought: “Whatever you all are doin’, keep on doin’ it!”

Founders Day at the Ohio Statehouse, Mission Reaffirmed

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In 1975, the Ohio Legislature passed H.B. 229, the bill that founded our college. Yesterday, we went back to the Ohio Statehouse for a Founders Day Celebration. Proclamations were presented in both the Senate and House chambers, and more than 150 guests joined us for an evening reception in the historic Statehouse Rotunda, where we celebrated 40 years of service to Ohio and honored those who made the college and our work possible. There, legislators presented us with a proclamation from Ohio Gov. John Kasich, recognizing the college’s 40th anniversary. The Singing Men of Ohio were spectacular.

View photos from the day’s celebrations.

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Meeting Ohio’s Healthcare Needs Against the Odds

_DSC0037.jpgADDRESSING OHIO’S GREAT HEALTH CARE CHALLENGES WITH A NEW OSTEOPATHIC MEDICAL SCHOOL TOOK VISION, PERSISTENCE AND A HEALTHY DOES OF COURAGE.

The legislation establishing our college was signed by Ohio Gov. James Rhodes on Aug. 18, 1975. The act stipulated that the first class be admitted within one year, a seemingly impossible deadline for developing a medical school. But we did it. When you look into the facts around the founding of the college, that the college came into existence at all seems miraculous. Against the odds, the college opened in 1976, thanks to a clear vision, persistence and a healthy dose of courage.  

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Our People: Harry Meshel, Senator and Lobbyist for the Heritage College

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“The rest of the state still needs you”

It could be fairly said that the Ohio University Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine would not exist without Harry Meshel, an Ohio state senator from 1971-93. The Youngstown Democrat forged a coalition of lawmakers, physicians and academics to lobby for and pass the legislation that chartered and funded the college in 1975.

Osteopathic connection: “I had always had an affection for the osteopathic process. My late wife had a D.O. who was a good friend of hers. Both of our kids were born to her.”

A college’s difficult birth: “Everybody was against us except [the Ohio Osteopathic Association]. My tradition in life is, when people start objecting, you fight harder. You teach them to respect you and understand you. That’s what you have to do with legislation. We began working, we drew allies in, got the speaker of the house interested, and got people in the senate interested.”

Motivation: In addition to his belief in osteopathic medicine, Meshel saw the college’s potential to transform health care in southeast Ohio. “I was on a social mission. There was virtually nothing else down in that corner of the state.”

A sweet victory: “Politics is usually a long line of headaches – people making you crazy, you never get to close any doors. It’s like a doctor: Sometimes you can’t solve the problem. But when you’re able to close a few doors, when you get to solve the problem, that’s satisfaction. [Helping establish the college] has been a wonderful experience for me.”

Point of pride: “That the doctors coming out of Ohio University stay here. They stay in the state. The school has just gone great guns. It’s one of the most pleasant surprises, how fast OU grew and how well they did. I was very happy and proud to be a part of it.”

Parting thought: “Don’t stop! You’ve just begun to build. You’re so successful. It’s like sports: Just because you’ve won a few games doesn’t mean you get to quit. The rest of the state still needs you. Kick the pants off the competition!”

 


Founding Voices
Perspectives from those whose personal story is woven into the college’s beginning. 

Our People: Anthony Chila, D.O.

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“The hands-on part is central to the whole idea”

Chila has had contact with every Heritage College graduating class, and his passion for teaching osteopathic manipulative medicine (OMM) has left many Heritage College alumni with a favorite Chila story. He joined the Heritage College faculty in 1978, and today is a professor emeritus of family medicine and faculty practitioner at University Medical Associates. A leading authority on OMM, he has served a variety of leadership roles in the American Academy of Osteopathy and in 2013 received the American Osteopathic Foundation’s Educator of the Year award.

Favorite class?: “I always had a great deal of favoritism for the Class of 1982. I enjoyed that group of people tremendously. I think they had as much fun with me, poking fun at me, as I had with them, harassing them. It was just a kind of a chemistry with that particular group. And that, by the way, was part of my learning process.”

Osteopathic medicine’s “secret sauce”: “The hands-on part is central to the whole idea of what an osteopathic physician is or is to be. Unfortunately, there is so much material thrown at students that it just boggles my mind that they can struggle with the hard-core academic material and still have some interest and some hope that they want to get something from the hands-on.”

His inspiration: “That ‘aha’ moment when you are working with your hands and you are trying to explain to a student or intern or a resident what it is you are looking for, how it is that you are preparing to make a diagnosis and what it is that you’re doing when you are implementing a treatment. There is something about that close work one-on-one with the student or resident over a patient and there seems to come a time when a huge light bulb goes on and a student literally says ‘aha, I understand what you’re talking about.’”

Parting thought: “Happy 40th anniversary, Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine. It’s been a pleasure and a privilege to be with you.”

 


Founding Voices
Perspectives from those whose personal story is woven into the college’s beginning.