Alumnus Dr. Moomaw addresses graduates, talks psychiatry, flight surgery

Forty years after starting medical school with our first entering class, alumnus Ronald C. Moomaw, D.O. (’80), brought it all back home May 7 as commencement speaker for the Heritage College class of 2016. Moomaw, a psychiatrist and flight surgeon who works with NASA astronauts, reminisced about the high adventure of launching a new medical college in converted dormitory buildings and lauded the school for giving him “the chance to have the most fascinating life I could possibly imagine.” He was one of 24 medical students who began their studies here in 1976. With 129 new physicians, the class of 2016 is the largest graduating class in the college’s history.

Watch a video of Dr. Moomaw’s commencement address.

View a gallery of photos from Commencement 2016. See more photos on Facebook. 

Read more.

40 Things to Know: The world’s first transgenic mammal was developed here

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Pictured (from left): Joseph Jollick and Thomas Wagner, both then faculty members at the Heritage College, were part of a research team responsible for a discovery that revolutionized biomedical research.

“It’s because of the way the medical school was founded – different from any osteopathic medical school before it. It changed the standing of osteopathic medicine, and that happened at Ohio University. Period.”

– Thomas Wagner, Ph.D., retired distinguished professor of molecular and cellular biology


Apparently, research really has been in our DNA from the start.

It was in 1980 – just four years after the college opened its doors – that a team led by Thomas E. Wagner, Ph.D., then a chemistry professor on our clinical and basic science faculty, developed DNA microinjection. In this process, an important addition to the genetic engineer’s toolbox, scientists take a gene for a particular trait from one animal and inject it into the embryo of another animal shortly after it’s fertilized. The new gene enters the DNA of the recipient, which can then pass the trait along to its offspring.

This discovery – and Wagner’s use of the process to create the world’s first transgenic mammal by transferring a rabbit gene into a mouse – revolutionized biomedical research, making national news at a time when gene-splicing was still in its infancy. A major collaborator in that research was microbiologist Joseph D. Jollick, Ph.D., who like Wagner was an original member of the college’s science faculty. The patented process of DNA microinjection, developed right here, remains a widely used, powerful tool in genetic medical research.

Wagner, who in 1983 co-founded biotech firm Diagnostic Hybrids Inc. and is now a retired distinguished professor of molecular and cellular biology, is still finding ways to use molecular biology to treat disease. In 2013 he founded Perseus PCI (Personalized Cancer Immuno-therapeutics), a clinic that treats cancer with vaccines made from patients’ own tumor cells.

At a time when the college is developing a comprehensive research strategy to reaffirm its commitment to focused scientific study, it’s worth remembering that our researchers have engaged in world-class work almost from day one. Recalling the earliest days of the college, Wagner stresses that a commitment to hiring top-notch basic science faculty was a hallmark from the start. In turn, he says, the high value placed on research raised the prestige of the college, and ultimately, the entire osteopathic profession.

“It’s because of the way the medical school was founded – different from any osteopathic medical school before it,” Wagner said recently. “It changed the standing of osteopathic medicine, and that happened at Ohio University. Period.”

News coverage about Dr. Wagner’s research:

Ohio University Compass (2014)

The Christian Science Monitor (1992)

The New York Times (1989)

 

40 Things to Know: Our Family Health radio program offered consumer health information for more than 30 years

Pictured: Frank Myers, D.O., dean emeritus; Carl Denbow, Ph.D., director emeritus of communications; and Doug Partusch, a producer for WOUB at that time.
Pictured: Frank Myers, D.O., dean emeritus; Carl Denbow, Ph.D., director emeritus of communications; and Doug Partusch, a producer for WOUB at that time.

“In this photo, which was taken in the control room of the recording studio at WOUB, we appear to be discussing a script – probably looking at a troublesome sentence that needed to be reworded in some way. We had a good team and always worked together to provide sound medical information in an easy-to-understand way. We’d make changes as necessary right up to the point that we did the recording.”  

– Carl Denbow, Ph.D., director emeritus of communications


In the age before WebMD and Internet-accessible medical and health news-you-can-use, there was Family Health radio. The program was the brainchild of Dr. Myers and championed by Dr. Denbow, Don Bilski, and many other radio announcers, producers and writers for more than 30 years. The two-and-a-half-minute program offered listeners timely, practical consumer-oriented health information. At its height, the program reached an estimated hundreds of thousands of listeners, on 250 radio stations domestically and worldwide in China, Canada, New Zealand, United Kingdom and the American Forces Radio Network.

40 Things to Know: Our college was led by the first female African American dean of a medical school

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Embracing diversity and serving the underserved are bedrock values for both our college and the osteopathic profession. So it shouldn’t be too surprising that we made history in August 1993, when our university and college chose an African American woman to be our dean.

When we announced that our new physician leader was Barbara Ross Lee, D.O., sister of Motown superstar Diana Ross, it marked a step forward for diversity in medical education. And Dr. Ross-Lee clearly understood that bringing more minorities into health care can mean better care for underserved populations. She also stressed the important role that osteopathic medicine can play in making that happen.

Speaking to Black Issues in Higher Education about her new job, Dr. Ross-Lee said osteopathic medicine offers great opportunities for minority physicians to improve care delivery to populations “we are most concerned about.” And as she has throughout her career, she spoke frankly about racial disparities in health care, calling them “a scandal of such long standing that it has lost the power to shock.”

Predictably, the national press had some fun with the fact that the new dean was sibling to a pop music icon. “Diana Ross’s big sister hit No. 1 on the charts this month,” deadpanned Knight Ridder/Tribune News Service. “Not the record charts. The medical charts.”

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Dr. Ross-Lee speaks at the 2014 Ohio Osteopathic Symposium.

African American media, though, cheered the appointment as a landmark. Dr. Ross-Lee herself hinted it was about time, telling Jet magazine that initially, she hadn’t realized her appointment was a historic first. “I probably, like the rest of the country, was a little surprised,” she admitted, adding that she hoped “this breaking of a barrier will just turn into a tide and we’ll see a lot more black females achieving in medical academics.”

Dr. Ross-Lee’s seven years at the helm were important for more than barrier-busting. Dean emeritus Jack Brose, D.O., who served from 2001-2012 and is now vice provost for health affairs, praises Ross-Lee for her bold innovation and “terrific leadership skills. I know I certainly learned a lot from her.”

Creative leadership was indeed, as Dr. Brose suggests, a hallmark of her tenure. Under her direction the college developed the nation’s first osteopathic post-doctoral training institute; its Centers for Osteopathic Research and Education; its two curricular options; an independent Department of Biomedical Sciences; and a Center of Excellence for Multicultural Medicine.

In 2001 Dr. Ross-Lee left our college to go to the New York Institute of Technology, where she currently serves as vice president for health sciences and medical affairs, and site dean for the Jonesboro, Ark., campus of NYIT’s College of Osteopathic Medicine.

Since moving on, she has continued to carry the standard for osteopathic medicine, health care diversity, and serving the underserved. In doing so, she has carried on a tradition as old as osteopathic medicine founder A.T. Still, who battled throughout his 19th century career against slavery and racism, and in favor of women’s rights.

Perhaps the symbolic breakthrough she achieved should have come earlier. We’re proud that it happened here.

Our People: Harry Meshel, Senator and Lobbyist for the Heritage College

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“The rest of the state still needs you”

It could be fairly said that the Ohio University Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine would not exist without Harry Meshel, an Ohio state senator from 1971-93. The Youngstown Democrat forged a coalition of lawmakers, physicians and academics to lobby for and pass the legislation that chartered and funded the college in 1975.

Osteopathic connection: “I had always had an affection for the osteopathic process. My late wife had a D.O. who was a good friend of hers. Both of our kids were born to her.”

A college’s difficult birth: “Everybody was against us except [the Ohio Osteopathic Association]. My tradition in life is, when people start objecting, you fight harder. You teach them to respect you and understand you. That’s what you have to do with legislation. We began working, we drew allies in, got the speaker of the house interested, and got people in the senate interested.”

Motivation: In addition to his belief in osteopathic medicine, Meshel saw the college’s potential to transform health care in southeast Ohio. “I was on a social mission. There was virtually nothing else down in that corner of the state.”

A sweet victory: “Politics is usually a long line of headaches – people making you crazy, you never get to close any doors. It’s like a doctor: Sometimes you can’t solve the problem. But when you’re able to close a few doors, when you get to solve the problem, that’s satisfaction. [Helping establish the college] has been a wonderful experience for me.”

Point of pride: “That the doctors coming out of Ohio University stay here. They stay in the state. The school has just gone great guns. It’s one of the most pleasant surprises, how fast OU grew and how well they did. I was very happy and proud to be a part of it.”

Parting thought: “Don’t stop! You’ve just begun to build. You’re so successful. It’s like sports: Just because you’ve won a few games doesn’t mean you get to quit. The rest of the state still needs you. Kick the pants off the competition!”

 


Founding Voices
Perspectives from those whose personal story is woven into the college’s beginning. 

Our People: Anthony Chila, D.O.

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“The hands-on part is central to the whole idea”

Chila has had contact with every Heritage College graduating class, and his passion for teaching osteopathic manipulative medicine (OMM) has left many Heritage College alumni with a favorite Chila story. He joined the Heritage College faculty in 1978, and today is a professor emeritus of family medicine and faculty practitioner at University Medical Associates. A leading authority on OMM, he has served a variety of leadership roles in the American Academy of Osteopathy and in 2013 received the American Osteopathic Foundation’s Educator of the Year award.

Favorite class?: “I always had a great deal of favoritism for the Class of 1982. I enjoyed that group of people tremendously. I think they had as much fun with me, poking fun at me, as I had with them, harassing them. It was just a kind of a chemistry with that particular group. And that, by the way, was part of my learning process.”

Osteopathic medicine’s “secret sauce”: “The hands-on part is central to the whole idea of what an osteopathic physician is or is to be. Unfortunately, there is so much material thrown at students that it just boggles my mind that they can struggle with the hard-core academic material and still have some interest and some hope that they want to get something from the hands-on.”

His inspiration: “That ‘aha’ moment when you are working with your hands and you are trying to explain to a student or intern or a resident what it is you are looking for, how it is that you are preparing to make a diagnosis and what it is that you’re doing when you are implementing a treatment. There is something about that close work one-on-one with the student or resident over a patient and there seems to come a time when a huge light bulb goes on and a student literally says ‘aha, I understand what you’re talking about.’”

Parting thought: “Happy 40th anniversary, Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine. It’s been a pleasure and a privilege to be with you.”

 


Founding Voices
Perspectives from those whose personal story is woven into the college’s beginning.